Inspiration Journal 2:Verbal or Text Based Design

Hello readers,

I would like to welcome you all in the second week of my inspiration journal. This week focus is on effective verbal or text based designs, how they reflect the specific target audience through different elements like voice and moods.

  1. Wendy’s.

arbys1.jpghttp://www.sabihafin.wordpress.com

Isn’t this funny? This verbal ad by Wendy’s did an effective use of design elements and concepts. The picture of a chick, the sandwich, and the typography creates a very good synergy. The purpose behind this ad was to show the target market, most likely healthy conscious people, that Wendy’s sells natural food. Another effective element in the add was creation of ‘voice’ through the rhetoric question which sounds so genuine. In addition to that the words and the chick creates a sense of humor, however the sound / feeling of the question is in a serious note.

2. KFC

KFC

Sometimes designers and advertisers prefer to use words with hidden meaning. The above ad by KFC is a typical example. That is to say the simple sentence used in the ad was not a mistake. The designer purposely used the ‘ambiguous’ call of action to tell his audience that he is absolutely sure they always think about the brand. In other words he is reminding them to think about it indirectly. The ad seemed to target young adults who likes jokes, this can be shown by the choice of copy and the size of the container.

3. Wendy’s.

wendyshttp://assets.fontsinuse.com/static/reviews/0/4f06d82b/full/2011-05-verlag-italic-for-wendys.jpg

The above ad reminds me of an old saying that people always remember stories. The technique in this ad was to use a short quotation which turns the brand as if its a person talking to you (customer) directly. It is always insisted that designers should decide who are they going to be in the ad, company, consumers, or other players? (Felton, 2013, p. 105, 108). The ad seems to target regular Wendy’s customers who are quality-driven based on the full meal picture as well as the choice of words.

4. MacDonald’s

mcdzohttp://branddna.blogspot.com/2012_08_01_archive.html

According to Felton, Advertising Concept and Copy, designers should always decide which voice to use to express their selling argument. In this ad by McDonald’s, the brand sounds like it is speaking to the customer directly in a simple, straight forward sentence with no ‘cliches.’  The typography sounds in a cool / friendly tone which is very important depending on how the designer wants his message to be received. The ad which was advertising a new lamb sandwich in form of a story-telling most likely target new customers who are not familiar with the company’s menu.

5. Wendy’s

frostyhttps://sabihafrin.files.wordpress.com/2015/04/566c9cb54ed1260a1b6a91680bba365d.jpg

The design used by Wendy’s in this ad is very amazing. The company creatively embodied words to make a glass of its most popular drink, strawberry frosty shake. A number of effective design elements can be seen from the ad. First is the proper use of ‘alignment’ through the objects in the ad. The arrangement of berries, bottle of milk, and flowers surrounding the text-shaped glass helps to show where the ‘focus / focal point’ is. Second, is the great use of contrast as well as font, this can be seen through the words making a shape of a glass are arranged from top to bottom with varying sizes. Based on the sweet sounding words, flowers and colors, the above ad most likely was meant for the teenagers and young adults especially females.

References

Felton, G. (2013). Advertising: Concept and Copy. 3rd Ed. New York: London. W.W Norton & Company.

Retrieved on November 18, from, http://www.sabihafin.wordpress.com

Retrieved on November 18, from http://branddna.blogspot.com/2012_08_01_archive.html

Retrieved on November 18, from http://assets.fontsinuse.com

Retrieved on November 18, from https://sabihafrin.files.wordpress.com

Retrieved on November 18, from http://adsoftheworld.com/sites/default/files/styles/media_retina/public/burgers.jpg?itok=slRkMnvt

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